Activities & Recreation

Hiking Trails

More than 25 miles of hiking trails lace the park, varying from easy to difficult. Most are less than one mile long, but interconnected trails offer the more ambitious hiker a good choice of routes over varying terrain. Maps with descriptions of each trail are available at the Visitor Center. Trail names give clues to the outstanding physical features of each: Cold Spring, Geological, Grassy Creek, Grassy Overlook, Lake, Loop, Overlook, Prospectors’ Ridge, River, Towers, and Tower Tunnel. Both the Ridge and Geological trails are self-guided, with booklets available at the Visitor Center that detail points and notes of interest. But if you would prefer, guided hikes are scheduled throughout the summer. Additionally, if you call ahead, our Visitor Center staff will be happy to plan a guided hike to meet your family’s or group’s schedule.

Elevations measured many years ago show heights varying from 870 feet at the Russell Fork River in the canyon bottom to 1,978 feet at Clinchfield Overlook (where the Overlook Trail begins.) The advent of modern GPS units shows the elevations to be higher. Surfaces are hard-packed dirt and rock, and are well maintained with steps and handrails where needed. All are marked with colored blazes, with no intersecting trails having the same color. Cautions: Pets must be leashed and we ask that visitors stay away from exposed overlooks during thunderstorms. Bicycles are permitted only on the Mountain Bike Trail.

The extraordinary range and variety of trails offered the hiker in our park is significant. Below we offer detail on each to help you choose your path. And enjoy every step!

Click here for trail descriptions.

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Biking (Mountain Bike Trail)

The Mountain Bike Trail offers breathtaking scenery. The trail is a stack loop trail system offering up to nearly 12 miles of riding, from moderate to difficult. Depending on the route chosen, bikers may plan rides of varying length, with the possibilities of good climbs and long downhill runs. Positive reviews for this trail are posted regularly on the websites for hiking enthusiasts.

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Geocaching


The 21st Century’s high-tech hide and seek!

Geocaching is an outdoor treasure hunting game for adventure-seekers of all ages. Using a GPS device, participants hide and seek small containers called caches, or “geocaches” and often post their experiences online. There are currently more than 60 geocaches hidden in and around the Breaks Park area.

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Birding

On the wing, in the soft and sometimes tempestuous air. Nested in the sheltering canopy of the Appalachians. What do you see and what might you hear? With a two-note shriek, or more muted and varied cry, our feathered friends also reign here.

As a part of the Virginia Birding and wildlife trail, Breaks Interstate Park is home to a wide variety of birds. Some of those include the Swainson’s Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Black and White Warbler, Yellow Rumped Warbler, Turkey Vulture, Red Tail Hawk and Osprey.

In 2007, Peregrine Falcons were released into the park as the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries reintroduced the species into Southwest Virginia and Southeast Kentucky. These birds had been wiped out in the Eastern United States due to the use of pesticides and chemicals such as DDT in the 1940’s and 50’s. Until the reintroduction effort, the last documented sighting in the state of Virginia was at The Towers in Breaks Park. In April 2011, a pair of Peregrine Falcons were again spotted at Towers Overlook offering hope that members of the species has returned to its historical nesting spot.

Each winter the park participates in the National Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count. The information collected is reported to the Audubon Society, where it is used to determine increases or declines in area species. We welcome public participation in this event. Should you wish to join us, more information is available by contacting the park Visitor Center.

A checklist detailing the different species found here, as well as our ongoing Recent Sighting List are available at the Visitor Center, or may be obtained by emailing jraines@breakspark.com or by calling 276-865-4413 ext. 3221.

Download our Birding Checklist Brochure here.

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Pedal Boats/Canoes

Pedal boats, hydro bikes, and canoes are available seasonally for rental by the hour or half hour on beautiful Laurel Lake. Visitors may use these boats as a means to explore, or for fishing.

Our boat dock hours of operation are as follows: April 30 – May 27: open Saturday – Sunday 11 am to 6 pm; May 28 – August 7: Sunday -Thursday 11 am to 6 pm, Friday – Saturday 11 am to 8 pm; August 8 – September 25: Saturday – Sunday 11 am to 8 pm; September 26 – October 30: Saturday – Sunday 11 am to 6 pm. Pedal boats are closed for the remainder of the year.

Rental Fees are:

Pedal boats, Hydro bikes, and Canoes: $6/half hour, $8/hour

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Fishing

Laurel Lake, Beaver Pond, and the Russell Fork River offer a variety of fishing experiences, and the promise of a good catch. Laurel Lake, a twelve-acre man-made lake, and our two-acre Beaver Pond are stocked with bluegill and bass. The Russell Fork River is stocked with Rainbow Trout by Virginia Game and Inland Fisheries officials.

Laurel Lake is located adjacent to Splash! in the Park. The Lake Trail circles Laurel Lake, ensuring many access points for fishermen.

Beaver Pond is located near the cottages. It may be accessed by the Deer Trail, which goes around the perimeter of Beaver Pond.

The Russell Fork River may be accessed at several points, including Garden Hole and Ratliff Hole, both of which are within park boundaries, but located outside the entrance to the park’s facilities.

Fishing licenses are required. Temporary licenses are available at the park Visitor Center.

Further information may be obtained by contacting the Visitor Center.

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Whitewater Rafting

For the serious adventurer, whitewater rafting is available on the raging rapids of the Russell Fork River. Each Saturday and Sunday during the first four full weekends in October, water is released from the John Flannagan Dam and Reservoir, creating world class rapids on the Russell Fork through the Breaks Gorge. Different sections of the river provide varying levels of difficulty. Rafters will find Class Two and Three rapids closer to the Flannagan Dam area, and rapids up to Class Six through the Breaks Park area on sections of the river where names like “twenty stitches,” “broken nose,” and “triple drop,” give some sense of the adventure to be had here. The gradient of the Russell Fork ranges from five feet per mile to an unbelievable 180 feet per mile. One violent 75-foot stretch, aptly named “El Horrendo,” is considered one of the most difficult in the East.

If you choose to take on the Russell Fork do be cautious; the river can be unkind to all but experienced paddlers. It is known throughout the rafting world as some of the wildest, most difficult whitewater anywhere and is best experienced with a guide or outfitter familiar with the river. The park doesn’t offer boat rentals or guided rafting, but many outfitters visit the Russell Fork each October to provide those services. Those interested in riding the rapids should locate an outfitter and plan their excursion ahead of time.

Our friends at Kentucky Whitewater offer river adventures during October weekends, and throughout much of the year.

For more information about their whitewater excursions, other available whitewater experiences, or to learn more about Kentucky Whitewater, click here.

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